UNDER CONSTRUCTION BUT WORTH A READ

A LARGE FORMAT/IMAX 3-D FILM ILLUSTRATING THE BRILLIANT CAPERBILITIES OF THE TRAINED ANIMALS THAT WORK IN MOTION PICTUTES. 

SEEKING A PRODUCER AND DIRECTOR 

 

"HOLLYWOOD'S ANIMAL ACTORS"

DRAFT FOR 40 MINUTE SCRIPT

BY

PETER SHILLINGFORD

                                        ufindshill@btinternet.com 

INT. CAVE DAY

The screen is dark but the sounds herald the nature of things to come... A slither! A hiss! Something oozes…a rock fall jars the senses...the screen fades up from black...The camera moves forward as in a point of view (POV). In this extended tracking move the POV looks nervously left and right, its motion activated by a sight or sound.

The cave is small and damp…eerie light reflects dully off its walls covered in hanging mold and moss. Light emanating from a crack in the roof cuts a shaft of luminescence through the dank and fetid air. Animal sounds can be heard from the depths of the cave. The beating of our heart increases.

The camera tracks through distorted and sinister stalagmites, past weapons and armour discarded by ancient intruders unsuccessful in their quest. The camera moves in on a hideous mummified body chained against one wall.

A slimy creature slithers from an eye socket. A rock tremor shakes the body loose and it collapses to the floor of the cave. The camera whip pans to the left. The sudden sound of beating wings heralds a flurry of bats, which engulf the camera, a split second later. The POV quickly moves forward.

The camera stops on a small open chest. A sapphire, the size of a man's fist seems to radiate a bluish light of its own. In the background we see a lattice of moldy wood strips. We quickly move to close on the sapphire.

The deathly silence is shattered as a human fist smashes through the lattice sending slow motion debris into camera. An explorer crashes through the opening and falls to the floor.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY.

He hears a muted but ominous rumbling. He looks up to see stalactites, keen as lances, shaking on the ceiling above him.

The tremor stops but his expression is taut with fear. As he cautiously gets up he wipes the sweat from his eyes.

He licks parched lips and swallows hard when he sees the jewel.

He reaches for it but whips back in terror.

INT. CAVE. CLOSER ANGLE. DAY.

A huge cobra is poised to strike inches from his face. The deadly guardian of the treasure is not to be denied.

The serpent strikes once, twice, three times, getting closer each strike but the explorer rolls behind the safety of a stalagmite.

Thunder and lightning rolls through the cave.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY.

The explorer emerges from the gloom behind the flattened hood of the cobra as it weaves in confusion, seeking its quarry. With the speed of a bolt leaving a crossbow, the explorer seizes the reptile, which flails helplessly in an iron grip.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY

The explorer brings the serpent almost to his face, then hurls the spitting creature away and at the camera. He grabs the emerald and holds it up in the shaft of light for a brief moment before bundling it into his backpack.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY

The explorer tries to get back into the opening when the second tremor strikes.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY

He looks up to see part of the ceiling beginning to cave in. He steps back as the lethal stalactites plummet down and into camera.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY

He frantically looks round for an avenue of escape. He sees an archway in the gloom darts for it and runs straight into the tangled strands of a giant spider's web, taut and resilient as stretched piano wire.

INT. CAVE. REVERSE ANGLE. DAY

The web stretches into camera with the explorer tangled in the strands. He reaches for his hunting knife and slashes his way through.

Gasping with terror and exertion, he makes for the arch but has to crawl on his back along a narrow ledge. We track back with him.

INT. CAVE. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY

He freezes with horror and revulsion when a he sees a large tarantula directly above him on the low ceiling.

As the tarantula drops, we crane up as the spider lands on the explorer's bare chest. He knows that if he as much as blinks he's history. The explorer shudders involuntarily and the tarantula hesitates, ominously rubbing its back legs together. The creature moves slowly onto his face.

INT. CAVE. REVERSE ANGLE. DAY

Explorer's POV of the tarantula as the creature moves across his face.

INT. CAVE. DAY

After agonizing seconds the tarantula shuffles onto our hero's mouth...he sneezes and blows the spider away. Panic stricken he falls of the narrow ledge and into the darkness below.

INT. TUNNEL. DAY

The camera tracks back with the explorer as he lands in frame and begins his wild helter-skelter ride down an overgrown spiraling tunnel. Rocky protrusions narrowly miss him and the camera.

INT. TUNNEL. REVERSE ANGLE. DAY

Camera takes the explorer's POV and continues down this mud soaked slide to who knows where. Curtains of vines and overhanging plants crash into this POV ride.

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER/CLIFF FACE. DAY.

Close on a giant lizard as its tongue darts from it's gaping mouth towards camera and snatches an insect. The camera tilts up to the cliff face.

INT. TUNNEL. DAY

We follow the explorer as he continues down this never-ending mudslide.

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER/CLIFF FACE. DAY.

The tunnel opening in the cliff face, which towers above the murky river, is obscured by foliage. Leaves are explosively scattered by the explorer as he's ejected from the opening.

He splashes down in the narrow river.

A croc in foreground yawns in anticipation.

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER. DAY

The explorer splutters to the surface as the huge crocodile surfaces under him, its snapping jaws twisting and turning to get at his legs.

He can do nothing but ride the brute.

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER. UNDERWATER. DAY

They both roll underwater in a 360-degree fight for life. Gasping for air, he grips the beast under its forelegs.

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER. DAY

He gains a foothold and drags the reptile towards the bank. With a final surge of adrenaline the explorer hurls himself away from the beast!

EXT. JUNGLE RIVER. REVERSE ANGLE. DAY

It turns on the camera; its gaping jaws fill the screen.

EXT. RIVER BANK. DAY

The explorer crawls up the bank and slowly sits up. He glances around apprehensively but relaxes with a sigh and a brief smile when he realizes that he has survived the ordeal.

The undergrowth behind him is bulldozed apart. The elephant looming over the explorer trumpets and flaps its ears in anger.

EXT. RIVER BANK. DAY

The explorer glances back at the reptile infested water. It's not an option! He knows it's the end of the line for him.

A Staffordshire terrier streaks in between his master and the trumpeting hulk.

The barking and growling Staffie stands his ground. The mighty elephant looks curiously at the tiny creature that would dare to confront him. Moving past the yapping dog the elephant curls his trunk around the terrified explorer and hoists him up onto his back.

The camera pulls back to reveal a full film crew.The director and trainer, Brian McMillan, nods and grins: "Print!" The crew breaks into applause and the elephant takes a bow. We track in on Brian.

MAIN TITLE. "HOLLYWOOD'S ANIMAL ACTORS."

Mist drifts over the scene.

EXT. FANTASY LAND DAY.

The mist disperses to reveal a fantasy scene of a flower-strewn field. The camera moves slowly through the flowers to where the Young Brian is asleep. A wistful smile plays on his lips when Nelly the elephant, masquerading as a Giant Mammoth, emerges out of his misty dreams.

EXT. WATER HOLE. DAY. MONTAGE

The elephant gently carries Young Brian to a favorite water hole to play water games with her baby mammoth.

V/0 NARRATOR.

Long before Homo Sapiens first

struck flintstone upon flintstone

to spark his fires, animals lived,

as they still do, by faculties

we cannot comprehend.

They see and hear things we cannot,

they navigate by radar and

mysterious means, using the

earth's magnetic lines, forces to

which we are blind and deaf.

Yet, we arrogantly assume

unconditional dominance and

regard them as a life form

far below us. We are wrong,

so dreadfully wrong, for they

exist on a plane we cannot

reach or ever hope to

understand.

EXT. FANTASY LAND DAY.

His mother who calls him from the house awakens Young Brian as he pats the baby mammoth. Match mix from the youngster to the adult Brian in next scene.

EXT. RANCH. DAY

Brian McMillan stares into the distance as his childhood memory fades. Brian alongside Nelly is putting the elephant through her paces for a mock charge. A young girl trainee is with him. Other folk, mostly cowboys, are sitting on the corral fence.

V/0. BRIAN

I'm Brian McMillan and I train

animals for Hollywood's motion

picture industry. We get to work

with all manner of creatures.

From insects such as a flea to

a Pachyderm...an elephant...this

sweetheart is called Nelly...and

we have been together for more

years than I care to remember.

EXT. RANCH. DAY.

With Nelly positioned at the far end of the corral Brian raises his hat then brings it down quickly. The young girl trainee has a broad smile.

EXT. CORRAL. DAY

Nelly begins her charge, thundering towards Brian and the trainee, who is beginning to lose her smile.

EXT. CLOSE ON NELLY. DAY

Tracking with the animal as it picks up speed.

EXT. CORRAL. DAY. CROSS CUT THIS SEQUENCE

Brian raises his hat and the elephant responds by raising her trunk. Brian then spreads his arms and Nelly's ears flap in mock anger. Putting his hands to his mouth, Brian lets out blood curdling scream!

Nelly trumpets back a roar that sets the canyon echoing. She stops a foot from Brian, plucks a flower and offers it to the camera. The girl trainee is first wide eyed with horror then delight to find she is still alive. Brian pats her on the back and puts his hat on her; Nelly takes it off and puts it back on his head.

V/O BRIAN

The psychoanalyst's tells us that

animals evoke powerful emotions

in audiences. Fear, revulsion,

delight, sadness and laughter.

Using animals in movies is as

old as the history of movies itself.

OLD MOVIE CLIPS. MONTAGE

Flickering images of the 1920's horse movies shot at California's Valdez Rocks with the rearing, rolling, falling and jumping stunts of these earlier cinema classics.

V/O BRIAN

In the bad old days there was

little or no control of cruelty.

Horses have always borne the

brunt in movies and were treated

cruelly at times. The old methods

used trip wires which often

damaged a horse.

Today there are dedicated men and

women who make it their life's

work to train the animals humanely

and correctly. Film and television

shoots are strictly monitored.

EXT. VALDEZ ROCKS DAWN

Beauty images of the light breaking over the ancient rocks.

EXT. VALDEZ ROCKS. DAY. MONTAGE

Duplicate the B & W images of scene 32 with present day stunt riders bringing their horses down and then being "thrown" into the audience.

MOVIE CLIP. MONTAGE

Sequence from actor/director Mel Gibson's film "Braveheart", showing various horses being catapulted.

BRIAN V/O

A custom built catapult was devised that would

throw dummy horses onto the sharpened stakes

of the Scots…not a horse was hurt, nor a stuntman impaled…

it's the magic of film.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. MONTAGE

Recreate the mechanical horse from Braveheart. The setting up, the actor on the wooden horse and the catapult action.

MOVIE CLIP. MONTAGE

Repeat scene …… to example the rapid cutting that confuses the eye between real horses and the catapulted version.

EXT. RANCH. DAY.

The stunt riders bring their horses up on their back legs as a final salute.

V/O BRIAN.

It's not only the trainers who

make these sequences work but

stunt men are vital in suspending

disbelief. They have to interact

with the animals in these hair

raising and dangerous scenes.

FILM CLIPS. MGM ROARING LION LOGOS.

Original MGM lion roaring logos from the 20's original to the present day.

V/O. BRIAN

This is undoubtedly the most

famous lion of all...

Continue with the MGM lion logos inter cut with B&W footage of trainers in trouble with lions.

V/O BRIAN

The lions used in the 1930's and

40's were basically wild animals,

no training whatsoever. They had

major problems in even getting

them out of their cages...not to

mention controlling them in front

of the camera… or to roar on cue...

It was pretty wild in those days,

but they got their shots...and a

few gray hairs.

EXT. RANCH. DAY.

Brian welcomes Charlie Sammutt as he steps out of his vehicle. A caravan is attached.

V/O BRIAN

Charlie Sammut is a specialist

animal trainer. His work in films

is acknowledged as being as one

of the best…

Track in as Charlie opens the top half of the caravan door and Josef his lion dramatically appears, totally filling the narrow door. Charlie hugs the creature and leads him out on a leash. We rapidly track back as Charlie and Josef cut a path through the waiting crew and observers.

EXT. STILLS SET. DAY.

The stills crew working on the set gather round Josef as he settles down on a podium. We track around as each crewmember nervously moves in for the "bonding". Each pats the animal with one exception, the biggest guy on the crew.

Brian and Charlie exchange a grin having worked with Josef before. We track back as the crew go to work. Josef is a superb, fully-grown lion and the model for the Disney film, "The Lion King". The crew go about recreating the "Lion King" poster photo shoot.

EXT. STILLS SET. ANOTHER ANGLE DAY.

A dozen kids are watching from the safety of the top of a truck. A large tree with overhanging branches is behind them.

FILM CLIP OF THE "LION KING"

V/O CHARLIE.

Josef was the model for the

Disney movie "The Lion King...

remember the poster? Let's get

Josef to autograph it.

EXT. STILLS SET. DAY

Charlie moves Josef off the podium and we track with him to a table where Charlie put the lion's paw in a film can of ink then imprints the paw onto a large poster of the "Lion King". The big guy who did not pat Josef comes in for his late "bonding". He hugs the lion around the neck.

V/O BRIAN.

All the hard work training the

animal is done here at the ranch,

we have areas set up for different

animals to work with their various

trainers. When the animal walks

onto the set he is primed and ready

to go...Well we hope so...but you

never know!

EXT. RANCH. DAY. MONTAGE.

Wide on training area as Josef the lion is taken through a series of exercises, walking on a leash, running alongside Charlie, jumping from box to box. Then off the leash for a workout with signals.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE

Charlie's last exercise is to have Josef roar on cue. Here we see the reward system.

V/O BRIAN

When an action is performed

correctly, a small piece of

meat is rewarded. No reward

for getting it wrong, just the

word "No" and a repeat of the

action.

At the end of the session Charlie's young son steps in and snuggles down with Josef.

EXT. STILLS SET. DAY

The kids on top of the truck are being stalked by Amy the baby chimp in the tree behind them. They are surprised and delighted by the friendly attentions of the chimp.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERT

BRIAN V/O

Chimps occasionally live alone, but usually can be found in-groups that range in size from twenty to a hundred individuals. These groups are called communities. These communities may break up into smaller groups of six or eight when the chimps travel, groom, feed, and rest throughout the day. Chimp communities are led by a dominant, or alpha, male. As the females grow up, they migrate to other communities. The strongest bond in the chimp's world is between mother and child. Chimp babies can remain with their mother for up to ten years, but even when they are older and have left the group, they will sometimes come back to visit their moms.

Chimps spend from five to six hours a day feeding and foraging for food. They were once thought to be strict vegetarians, but they also eat meat, including baboons and other monkeys. Chimps are very strong and male chimps have been known to slam a small baboon against the ground to kill it. Chimps can be dangerous but will usually flee rather than fight if threatened.Chimps are among the elite group of animals that use tools. They will place a stick in a termite mound, and as the insects come out the ground and crawl up the stick, they will lick them off. They also use a crumpled leaf to soak up water.

Like humans, a chimp's facial expression is often a clue to its emotional state. When frightened, a chimp draws back its upper lip and exposes its teeth. When happy, the face is relaxed, and the chimp sometimes makes an "oh-oh" sound that turns into a bark. A sad chimp will throw its head back, open its mouth wide, and shut its eyes. Chimps, however, like other non-human primates, do not shed tears.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE

A young woman animal trainer approaches Brian. She's carrying an armful of snakes and has a 10-foot python draped around her body.

She smiles and does a quick gag to Brian by placing the writhing mass of snakes on her head a la Medusa.

The grinning Brian unwinds the huge python from around the woman's body.

V/O. BRIAN

Not all animals can be trained.

Take this little fella for

instance...

A dozen ranch employee's form a line to stretch the python to its massive 20 foot extent. Camera tracks the length of the snake with its grinning handlers. The head of the snake is turned to camera in close up.

 

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE MONTAGE.

Brian and assistants working with pythons, snakes, spiders and scorpions. Demonstrations on how these creatures are tempted, not trained to do things.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE

Close up of a terrified woman as native headhunters tie her to a tree.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. ANOTHER ANGLE CLOSE

Snakes emerge from under her shirt.

She screams but soundlessly.

V/O. BRIAN

You won't hear her scream, we

put that on the soundtrack

after. The less noise on the

set the better it is for the

creatures being worked.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE

A young woman animal trainer approaches Brian. She's carrying an armful of snakes and has a 10-foot python draped around her body.

She smiles and does a quick gag to Brian by placing the writhing mass of snakes on her head a la Medusa.

The grinning Brian unwinds the huge python from around the woman's body.

V/O. BRIAN

Not all animals can be trained.

Take this little fella for instance...

A dozen ranch employee's form a line to stretch the python to its massive 20 foot extent. Camera tracks the length of the snake with its grinning handlers. The head of the snake is turned to camera in close up.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

BRIAN V/O

Constrictors, including pythons, boas, and the water-loving anacondas, are non-poisonous but nonetheless very dangerous snakes. Constrictors can grow to be huge. The giant anaconda of South America, for example,can reach 37 ½ feet and weigh 400 pounds. Contrary to popular belief, these snakes do not crush the bones of their victims. Instead, they coil their bodies around them, exerting pressure on the diaphragm until the animal loses consciousness. Once the constrictor senses no heartbeat, it starts to swallow its victim whole. After feeding, it takes a long time for the snake to digest its food. The giant anaconda takes about a week to digest a six-foot caiman, and it may not eat again for months. Constrictors are able to open their mouths very wide,for like all snakes; their jaws are only loosely connected to their skulls. The jaws also separate into left and right sections joined by a flexible ligament. The throat walls are also very stretchy, and the snake's brain is protected by a casing of bone, which prevents it from being damaged during the stretch. Constrictors can also breathe when their mouths are full (don't try doing this at home)!

There have been many tales of constrictors devouring cattle, horses, and other large animals. They can, however,swallow only animals weighing one hundred pounds or less. Constrictors have been known to seize and devour people. Of the 2,500 species of snakes, only 250, or 10 percent, are poisonous and only slightly more than half of these are really dangerous to human beings. These poisonous snakes are divided into four groups, including the cobras and close relatives, such as the mambas and coral snakes. A second group is made of poisonous sea snakes.

The third group consists of the true vipers. The fourth includes the pit vipers, most of which live in North and South America, although some are found in Asia. The cobras of Africa and Asia, the coral snakes of America, the mambas of Africa, and all the poisonous snakes of Australia (the only place where poisonous snakes outnumber non-poisonous ones) are known as elapids. Elapids have poisonous fangs that are rigidly fixed in their upper front jaws and are always erect and ready for use. The poison of the elapids attacks the nervous system.

The fangs of most poisonous snakes, including the elapids, have a hollow channel inside them. This channel has a tiny opening in the upper end to receive the venom from the snake's poison glands. At the lower end, there is an even smaller hole just above the pointed tip through which the poison is injected into he snake's prey. The hypodermic needle was modeled after the fang of a poisonous snake. The elapid family includes some of the largest and most

lethal snakes in the world, including the king cobra. Often growing to lengths of fourteen feet (one was measured at eighteen feet), the king cobra is the largest poisonous snake in the world. Aggressive and quick - it can rear up six feet from the ground to strike - its poison is powerful enough to kill an elephant, and there have been reports of this actually happening. Another dangerous elapid is the black mamba of Africa. A fast, slender snake, it often stays hidden from view among rocks or tall vegetation, striking without warning.

The coral snakes of North and South America are beautifully coloured, most with alternating bands of red, yellow and black.They rarely bite humans, and when they do, their venom is usually not fatal. The death adder lives in Australia,home to about eighty-five different kinds of poisonous snakes. It is one of the most poisonous of the elapids.

About 50 percent of people who are bitten by the death adder will die. The taipan is another deadly Australian snake.It injects an enormous amount of highly poisonous nerve venom into its victim. A person bitten by a taipan will die within a few minutes. Fortunately, the taipan lives in very lightly populated areas of Northeast Australia, and, if threatened, it will usually try to escape rather than attack.

 Sea snakes are found in the warm coastal waters of the western Pacific and Indian oceans. They are very dangerous -one variety has poison that is fifty times more venomous than that of the king cobra. Although they rarely bite humans, they are nonetheless dangerous. The U.S. Navy, on a scale of 1+ (minimum danger) to 4+ (maximum danger) rates sea snakes as 3+and advises divers to leave the water when they are around.The fangs of the true vipers, unlike those of snakes in the cobra family, are not fixed in the jaw, but lie folded backalong a depression in the upper jaw. The long, curved fangsspring forward when the viper is ready to bite. One of the most lethal. Of the true vipers is the puff adder,which is found everywhere in Africa except the rain forests.This snake gets its name from the way it puffs its self up and hisses a warning when alarmed. The puff adder strikes very quickly, and although it's poison is slow acting, it often causes death. Another deadly snake is Russell's viper.This aggressive snake is probably responsible for more deaths than cobras (when Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the story The Speckled Band,he was referring to this snake).

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE MONTAGE.

Brian and assistants working with pythons, snakes, spiders and scorpions. Demonstrations on how these creatures are tempted, not trained to do things.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. CLOSE

Close up of a terrified woman as native head-hunters tie her to a tree.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. ANOTHER ANGLE CLOSE

Snakes emerge from under her shirt. She screams but soundlessly.

                                             V/O. BRIAN

You won't hear her scream, we

put that on the soundtrack after.

The less noise on the set the better

it is for the creatures being worked.

As Brian walks into the frame she relaxes and smiles when he gathers the snakes in his arms.

                                                V/O BRIAN

To make a scene work, the stars

      Have be comfortable and physically

involved with the animals...this

is a blouse designed with pocket

compartments for the snakes to

appear from . . .all they want to do is

          get away from this woman, lovely as she is.

EXT. WARNERS BACK LOT

Wide on Studio signage and Clint Eastwood's mobile home dressing room.

EXT. LOCATION CATERERS LUNCH TABLE. DAY.

Clyde, the orang-utan, drops in from the top of frame to hang upside down. He amuses himself ... and the audience by pulling faces.

                                                V/O BRIAN.

Don't be fooled by that lovely

old man's smile, pound for pound

he's one of the strongest creatures

in the forest...he can rip a man's

arm off in seconds...but he won't

because he thinks and acts just

like one of us.

EXT. WARNERS BACK LOT. DAY

Clint Eastward greets his son and daughter. On seeing Clyde, Clint grins, ambles over and points his pistol finger at Clyde, who falls back in a dead faint. Clint blows the smoke from the end of his finger and winks at camera.

                                                V/O BRIAN

How do actors feel about working

with animals? The usual answer

is that they don't! Animals will

steal a scene just by doing almost nothing.

Some say that this is the essence of good acting...

but do we have any idea how the animals feel?

Clyde sits up and makes an impolite sign at the camera.

V/O BRIAN

We'll ignore that comment...for now!

Clyde comes up with a sign that reads "Lets go to the beach". Clint waves goodbye.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

BRIAN V/O

The orang-utan dwells in the forests of Borneo and Sumatra. It has orange red fur and can weigh up to 165 pounds. The word "orang-utan" means "person of the forest" in Malay. There are two subspecies: the Sumatran orang-utan and the Bornean orang-utan. The females of the species look very much alike, but Sumatran males are taller and slimmer than their Bornean cousins and, when mature, have a long moustache and beard.

The Bornean males are often darker than the Sumatran subspecies and have huge check flaps and a pouch under the skin.In captivity, orangs adapt well to living in-groups, but in the wild, adult males live alone, coming together with females on a temporary basis for mating. They are cautious and slow, rarely brachiating more than three to four yards a time with their long arms, which can reach eight feet.

Orangs are called "imperfect brachiators" because they are too heavy to move swiftly through the trees. They sometimes fall out of trees - it is estimated that one-third of orangs have broken bones from such falls by the time they are grown. Like other pongids, orangs are very strong. In their native lands, they are said to be able to kill crocodiles with their bare hands.

But because of habitat destruction, orang-utans are severely endangered. There are only about 4,000 of them left in the wild, and many primatologists believe that there will be few, if any, remaining in Sumatra and Borneo by the year 2000.

EXT. BEACH. DAY

On the beach Brian is being chased by his Bengal tigers. Camera tracks with him. As the tigers catch him they tumble into the surf and the wrestling match begins.

By mounting the 3-D camera on a hovercraft we are able to move on both sand and water as the tigers are play fighting on the beach and in the surf. The wind and spray from the hovercraft are elements to heighten the visual.

EXT. BEACH. ANOTHER ANGLE.

Another tiger comes barrelling through the spray and joins in the battle.

EXT. BEACH. CLOSER. MONTAGE. DAY

Brian disappears in a shower of spray and foam as 600 pounds of solid muscle slams into him! Brian surfaces and tries to separate the two creatures.

EXT. BEACH. DAY

Other trainers appear from behind rocks and fallen trees to separate the animals. We track with them as they run to help. The giant cats are obviously enjoying the game. The trainer's separating the animals is a dangerous and rare sight.

V/O BRIAN

We will never really know how

animals feel about what they are

doing but we can only judge by

what we see…it seems that they

enjoy themselves immensely.

Montage of slow motion tiger antics as they frolic in the surf.

LASSIE MOVIE CLIP.

Original 30's movie clip of Lassie The Wonder Dog, confronting a snarling and spitting mountain lion. The cowboy hero rescues a young girl in danger.

V/O BRIAN

Lassie is probably the most

loved movie animal actor of all

time. And a lady!

EXT. RANCH. DAY. MONTAGE

Brian takes the present day Lassie through a similar sequence involving the young girl and a mountain lion. We learn that this is Lassie's great great granddaughter.

Complete the sequence with the young girl interacting with Lassie and the mountain lion.

V/O BRIAN

Children seem to have a special

affinity with animals.

EXT. RANCH SWIMMING POOL. DAY

Camera cranes down from Young Brian who is sitting in a tree, watching Brian lead the children from a local orphanage in a conga line towards the swimming pool. They all sing and whistle "The Teddy Bear's Picnic" with great gusto.

EXT. CLOSE SWIMMING POOL. DAY

The smiles of the children radiate their delight when two bear cubs re-enacts the Teddy Bear's Picnic alongside the pool. Camera tracks around and over as Mother bear appears and drops into the pool.

EXT. TEA TABLE DAY

Young chimps join in the tea party with the baby bears and the children are exchanging tasty morsels with these delightful creatures.

EXT. LAWN ALONG SIDE POOL DAY MONTAGE

Baby leopards are roughhousing with two teenagers.

EXT. CLOSE SWIMMING POOL. DAY

A baby orang-utan, carried in on a pole as if captured, is sucking happily on a baby's bottle filled with warm milk.

V/0 BRIAN.

Mixing different species of

animals is very difficult so

we start when they are young

and working with bears and

chimps is not always a picnic.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

BRIAN V/O

WHY THE CHEETAH'S FACE IS STAINED WITH TEARS.

One day in Zululand, a lazy and evil-minded hunter was sitting under a tree, watching as a female cheetah went hunting. The man was amazed at the speed and accuracy with which the big cat stalked and finally caught her prey, a fine, fat springbok, and was also surprised at the three young cheetah cubs who sat in the distance under the shade of a tree, watching as their mother caught their dinner.

Knowing that cheetahs are shy and timid creatures that never attack man, and being the slothful sort that he was, the man decided that he would take one of the cubs and train it to hunt for him. He waited until the sun set and the mother cheetah went hunting again. Quickly he went to where the young cheetahs were sleeping peacefully in the grass. Because he could not decide which one to take and was greedy as well as lazy, he stole them all.

When the mother came back some time later with another springbok, she called to her children with that strange cry that cheetahs make, a sound more like that of a bird chirping than of the roar of a big cat. She called and called until she realised that her babies were gone.

Broken hearted, she started to cry. She cried and cried, and the tears ran down her cheeks and made dark stains. Her weeping was so loud that an old man heard the noise and came to her lair to see what was going on.

When the old man heard what had happened, he became very angry. Not only had the evil man stolen the cheetah's children, he had also behaved dishonourably, for the rules of the hunt stated that a man must use only his skill and strength and not take advantage of others.

The wise old man went and told the elders of the village, and they, too, became angry - so angry that they banished the wicked, lazy man from the village forever.

When the old man returned the cheetah's cubs to her, she was overjoyed, but her long period of weeping had left dark stains on her face, stains that are there to this day.

EXT. DANCE STUDIO DAY

Camera tracks around a group of actor/dancers who are replicating the body language of a bear. One man, Jim, Stan Winston's protégé, is giving the actors direction.

                                                   V/O BRIAN

Stan Winston was one of the masters

of creating an actor's performance

in an animal costume, often with

additional help such as prosthetics,

electronics and computer graphic

enhancements.

INT. DANCE STUDIO DAY

Stan Winston's protégé Jim completes the dressing of an actor in a Grizzly Bear costume. The actor behaves as a human inside the costume, standing up straight and walking normally.

                                               V/O BRIAN

Do humans in animal costumes work?

Let's find out.

Jim claps his hands and the actor begins the metamorphism into a Grizzly, his body language a perfect take on the animal scrabbling for food or shaking a tree. The actor throws his head back and emits a thundering roar.

EXT. FOREST. DAY MONTAGE

From dense bush comes an answering roar and Bart, trainer Doug Seuss's grizzly bear, explodes into the clearing. Doug follows and he and Bart engage in a mock fight.

EXT. FOREST. DAY.

Track with redneck family in a beat up open convertible, the two kids in the rear seat are scoffing hamburgers and chucking the wrappers out of the car. Dad tosses a beer can out as well. Mother has a peanut butter sandwich and a cigarette going at the same time. She parks the sandwich on the dash and tosses the cigarette over the side

EXT. FOREST. LAKE SIDE DAY.

Dad parks the car and they all bundle out and hike off into the woods.

EXT. FOREST. LAKE SIDE ANOTHER ANGLE DAY.

A fully-grown brown bear appears and explores the vehicle. He tears the door of the convertible off and clambers in to get at the sandwich. An odor from the glove compartment, which, with the door ripped off, reveals a jar of peanut butter, which is instantly consumed.

Exploring further the bear rips the passenger seat out to find empty beer cans on the floor. The rear seat, covered in hamburger stains is shredded.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

BRIAN V/O

The little sun bear is also called the Malayan bear. It gets its name from its habit of basking in the sun for hours. Of all the bears, this is the most agile climber. Sun bears are found in the tropical forests and woodlands of southern China, eastern India, and Borneo and Sumatra. They are popular pets in many Asian countries, and their flesh is also eaten.

Bears give birth to one to three cubs, which are no bigger than rats when they are first born. It takes two to four weeks for them to open their eyes. The little cubs stay with their mother for about a year before venturing out on their own.

Unfortunately, some species of bear, especially those native to the Asian nations, are rapidly disappearing. This is because their body parts and fluids, including gallbladders, paws, fat, spinal cords, blood, and bones are widely used in Asian folk medicine as remedies for complaints ranging from baldness to rheumatism. Many of these remedies, of course, are completely useless, but bear bile has been found effective in treating certain liver and gallbladder iseases in humans. Although a synthetic version of the bile is available at a fraction of the price, purists prefer the real thing.

Sadly, poachers have taken to slaughtering bears in other nations, including the United States, for their body parts. Recently an 800-pound black bear, one of Canada's largest, was found dead in Riding Mountain National Park. Its gallbladder had been cut out.

To meet the demand for bear bile, wildlife farms have sprung up throughout Asia, including China and North and South Korea, where live bears are kept and "milked" for their bile. A tube is implanted in the gallbladder and the bile is extracted through it. This, of course, prevents the bear from being killed, but whether or not it is a humane practice….

The smallest bear is the sun bear of southeastern Asia; it weighs less than 150 pounds and stands about four feet tall. The largest is the polar bear, which can stand over eight feet tall and weigh about 1,100 pounds. The enormous polar bear is found across the Arctic Ocean on sea ice and along the Arctic coastlines of Norway, Canada, Russia, and the United States. It is the most carnivorous of all bears, subsisting almost entirely on seals and fish. An excellent swimmer, it paddles with its front legs only.

The brown bear is found in North America, Europe and Asia and is the most diverse of all bear species - it can be found in deserts, rain forests, mountains, and even the Arctic tundra. In the Pacific Northwest, brown bears enjoy dining on spawning salmon. Despite its name, the brown bear comes in a wide range of Colours, including cream, reddish brown, grey, and dark brown. Some brown bears especially older ones are almost black.

The Kodiak bear, which is found only in Alaska, is a variety of brown bear. The Kodiak rivals the polar bear in size. The grizzly bear was once thought of as a separate species ("Ursus horribilis," meaning "horrible bear") but scientists now recognise that it is also a type of brown bear.Like its cousin the brown bear, the American black bear has a misleading name; its colour can range from black to brown to almost white. Many black bears in the western part of the United States, including those in Yellowstone National Park, are brown. Unlike the brown bear, which can live in a variety of habitats, the black bear is rarely found outside of woodlands.

The Asiatic black bear can be found throughout Asia. It is also called "the moon bear" and can be recognised by the distinctive white V on its chest. The Asiatic black bear is more aggressive than other bears.

The sloth bear, with its long, shaggy black fur, looks different from other species of bear. It gets its name from its ability to hang upside down from tree branches, like a sloth. It is sometimes called the "honey bear" because of its love of the sweet, sticky stuff. The sloth bear lives in tropical dry forests of India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, and Bangladesh.

It has a tube like snout that it uses to suck up termites, like a vacuum cleaner. This is the only species of bear to carry its young on its back. Although it moves slowly, like a sloth, it can be dangerous when surprised at close range.

The spectacled bear is South America's only species of bear.It is found from Colombia to northern Argentina and lives high in the mountains above 14,000 feet. It earns its name from the masklike white markings around its eyes. The spectacled bear is a good climber and sometimes even sleeps in trees.

EXT. FOREST. LAKE SIDE ANOTHER ANGLE DAY.

Close on the trunk finds two huge hairy paws tearing the lid off for the hamper basket inside. This also is demolished.

                                                V/O BRIAN

Often we do Public service

commercials which warns tourists

not to leave open food in their

vehicles, this is made clear as

the bear dismantles the vehicle

in search of the food. Here we

used a real bear and an actor...

did you spot the difference

The actor removes his headpiece.

EXT. FOREST. LAKE SIDE DAY.

The family return to the destroyed vehicle and their late late lunch.

EXT. DESERT. DAY.

Low angle pan across a shimmering desert. A lizard suddenly scuttles into frame, startling the audience. The camera tilts up to a falcon floating high above the desert.

EXT. DESERT. DAY. ANOTHER ANGLE

A Toureg gallops towards camera at break-neck speed. We track with him. The high-flying falcon swoops into frame behind the Toureg and streaks past the horseman and the camera and out of shot.

EXT. DESERT. DAY. ANOTHER ANGLE

The Toureg reins in his horse and stops inches away from the camera. The falcon circles and dives to alight gently on the Toureg's arm.

EXT. DESERT. DAY.

Brian activates a wind machine. An assistant has the hawk hooded and on his arm.

EXT. DESERT. ANOTHER ANGLE DAY.

A camera crew adjusts their position alongside the spinning blades. The assistant releases the bird close to the safety mesh of the wind machine and the bird hovers against the flow of the air.

                                                V/O BRIAN

Bird trainers have a training

technique where a wind machine

is placed behind the camera and a

bird is released to hover close

to the wind machine for a unique

slow-motion 3-D image. The bird's

image can also be manipulated to

create a series of fantasy effects.

EXT. DESERT. CLOSE UP DAY. MONTAGE

Mix through a selection of different birds, each bird increasing in size with the final bird, a Golden Eagle with a 6 foot wingspan. With the bird removed we see blue sky.

EXT. OCEAN DAY

The blue sky mixes to the blue of the ocean as we pan down to the bow and a dozen dolphins riding the wave.

EXT. OCEAN/DOLPHIN POOL. DAY. MONTAGE

Mix from the ocean into a fantasy sequence of Young Brian riding on a dolphin's back. Leaping! Splashing! Diving! A school of dolphins surrounds him in a display of joyful exuberance by these forgiving creatures. Consider underwater sequence.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

                                             BRIAN V/O

Bottlenose dolphins are found in the coastal waters of the continental shelf as well as the open sea. This is the species of dolphins most of us are familiar with (Flipper was a bottlenose dolphin). Like orcas, they are friendly, intelligent animals that can be taught to perform an impressive array of tricks.

Other whales besides the Orca, including the pilot whale, are actually dolphins. They are called "whales" only because they are larger than most dolphins.

The spotted dolphin can jump twenty feet above the surface of the water. Other dolphins can perform similar acrobatics; the spinner dolphin gets its name from its ability to leap from the water and spin in the air. This playful animal sometimes makes seven or more complete turns in a single leap.

Dolphins are long-lived animals, sometimes reaching forty years of age. Dolphins can hear well, but they have no sense of smell and little sense of taste.

Like bats, many dolphins use echolocation to find food, especially in murky waters where visibility is poor. They can be amazingly accurate; a blindfolded bottlenose dolphin can distinguish a 2-½ inches in diameter from a distance of five feet.

Like other cetaceans, dolphins lack vocal cords. But they make a variety of sounds, including clicking noises and whistles. Dolphins have a complex system of air channels and cavities in their heads that are connected to their blowholes. By some process not quite understood, air circulating through these channels seems to make the sounds.

Dolphins have a bump, called a melon, on the front of their heads. This is filled with fatty tissue and oil that carries sound well. The melon also helps focus the clicks into a narrow stream of sound.

Dolphins and porpoises live in all but the coldest waters of the world and can dwell anywhere from the deep waters of the oceans to great rivers like the Amazon and Ganges. Most of the dolphins we are familiar with live in coastal waters.

Porpoises are generally smaller than dolphins and have short, blunt snouts instead of the long, sharp "beaks" that characterise dolphins. The major difference between dolphins and porpoises, however, is in their dentition.

Dolphin teeth are shaped like small cones, and porpoise teeth resemble little shovels (in this section "dolphins" will be used to refer to both dolphins and porpoises). There are about forty dolphin and six porpoise species. Porpoises are members of the family Phocoenidae, and marine dolphins are members of the family Delphinidae.

Most dolphins are large, ranging in length from six to nine feet and weighing between 200 and 400 pounds. The smallest dolphin is the franciscana, which is about four feet long and weighs only 45 pounds.

The biggest dolphin is the killer whale, or Orca. A full grown male Orca can be about thirty-one feet long and weigh a whopping nine tons. Orcas can be recognised by their distinctive black and white colouring and mouthful of large, pointed teeth.

Orcas are fierce carnivores, preying on penguins, seals, and even fish. They will roam up to sixty-eight miles per day in search of food. Orcas are the only cetaceans that feed on homoiothermic animals. They have even been known to

Whales, dolphins, and porpoises belong to the order Cetacea. Cetacea comes from two words: The Greek cetus and the Latin ketos, which both mean "whale".

Cetaceans range in size from dolphins measuring five feet long to the mighty blue whale, the largest living animal.

There are seventy-six species. Some of them, such as the blue whale, are very rare; others, like the friendly bottlenose dolphin, are fairly common.

Cetaceans are found in every ocean of the world and several rivers. Like those of pinnipeds, the bodies of cetaceans are modified for life in the water. Cetaceans have a layer of blubber underneath their skin that insulates them from the cold.

There are no hind limbs, and the forelimbs have developed into flippers. Like the true seals, cetaceans have no external ears. Most of them have a dorsal fin located on their backs to help them glide smoothly through the water, and a flattened tail that is divided into two flukes.

The nasal openings, called blowholes, are located at the top of the head. The blowhole can be rectangular, or crescent-shaped, or a crosswise slit.

When cetaceans surface for air, they must first breathe out. The blow, or spout, is the name given to the cloud of moist vapour that is blown off as the animal empties its lungs.

A whale's blow consists of fine oil droplets that come from its sinuses and a detergent like substance from the lungs. The blow leaves a greasy film on anything within range.

EXT. DOLPHIN TRAINING FACILITY. DAY.

Trainers working with dolphins.

                                          V/O BRIAN

The training of dolphins is extremely specialized.

The respect as well as the love and care bestowed on them

by their trainers is a moving experience.

Other creatures that are not quite so benign have

also graced the silver screen.

EXT. UNIVERSAL STUDIOS TOUR. DAY.

The John Williams music from "Jaws" builds to a crescendo.

CLOSE UP of the mechanical shark exploding into shot.

                                          V/O BRIAN

Another famous mechanical actor is

Bruce the great white shark from

Steven Spielberg's "Jaws"...a

brilliant piece of work.

EXT. UNIVERSAL TRAM DAY.

Horrified tourists on the tram scream and shout as Bruce comes within inches of their faces.

EXT. UNIVERSAL TRAM CLOSE UP DAY

Laughter as the tourists wipe the water off their faces.

EXT. UNIVERSAL TRAM ANOTHER ANGLE. DAY.

Close on the fuel jetty as it blows up in flames and sinks.

EXT. UNIVERSAL TRAM CLOSE UP. DAY

Over shoulder of tourists recovering from the explosion as Bruce strikes again.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

                                       BRIAN V/O

Sharks, rays, and skates are among the most primitive fish; some of them have scarcely changed in 100 million years. Sharks have no bones. Their skeletons are made of cartilage (the same material that makes up our noses) hardened by lime. Sharks have several rows of teeth. When one in the front row falls out or is lost, a tooth in the second row moves in to replace it. It has been estimated that during a period of ten years, a tiger shark may go through 24,000 teeth. Because of hunting and habitat destruction, some sharks are in danger of extinction. In some parts of the world, sharks are also used as food, contributing to their decreasing numbers. Shark liver is very high in vitamin A, and an extract made from these primitive fish is even being touted as a cure for cancer.

INT. WORKSHOP. DAY.

CLOSE UP on a scale model of the tram approaching the ramp, which triggers and flies Bruce the Shark out of the water and into the faces of the tourists. We see a pair of hands demonstrating the hydraulics needed to lift this mechanical monster. Pull back to reveal Steven Spielberg.

V/O STEVEN SPIELBERG

Computer graphics can create the

most amazing screen creatures.

"Jurassic Park" is a perfect

example, the artistry of the

painters on the computer created

this incredible creature that was

so easy to believe in.

EXT. ROLLING HILLS. DAWN

A slow pan across mist covered outcroppings of rocks, all twisted and gnarled by the elements, finds a handsome young knight wandering lost on his black charger, both are exhausted. From out of the mist comes Young Brian leading a White Unicorn upon which is a Princess.

Two musicians with pipes and drum follow.

RESEARCH IMAGES FOR INSERTION

                                          BRIAN V/O

Mythical beasts have been a staple of human imagination for thousands of years. One of the most enduring animals of the imagination, of course, is the unicorn, which William Butler Yeats referred to as "a noble beast, a most religious beast [which] dances in the sun."

The unicorn was well known in the ancient world. The Persian writer Ctesias, who lived in the fifth century B.C., gave this description: "There are in India certain wild asses which are as large as horses, and larger. Their bodies are white, their heads dark red, and their eyes dark blue.

They have a horn on the forehead which is about a foot-and-a-half in length. The base of the horn is pure white, the upper part is sharp and a vivid crimson; and the remainder, or middle portion, is black." Ctesias ended this remarkable description by writing, "The animal is exceedingly swift and powerful, so that no creature, neither the horse nor any other, can overtake it." Other ancient writers disputed Ctesias's description.

Pliny the Elder (A.D. 23-79) wrote: "The Indians hunt many wild beasts, the fiercest of which is monoceros ["one-horned" in Greek]. The monoceros has a body like a horse, a head like a stag, feet like an elephant, and a tail like a boar. It makes a deep bellow, and one black horn about three feet long projects from the middle of its forehead. This animal cannot be taken alive."

EXT. ROLLING HILLS. ANOTHER ANGLE. DAWN

The camera cranes down to reveal The Sword Excalibur, imbedded in a huge stone. The Princess bides the knight remove the sword from the stone.

EXT. CLOSE ON STONE. DAWN

The knight tries and tries but cannot remove the sword; he moves to the Princess and kisses her hand. Young Brian steps forward and effortlessly removes the sword from the stone and twirls it in the air. Lightning ripples around the blade of the sword. Young Brian points the sword directly into camera. Shafts of electrical effects are directed into camera.

INT. WORKSHOP. DAY.

Sparks streak into camera as an acetylene torch is moved to camera. Camera tracks back.

The McMillan workshop is a horse barn brimming with strange structures and wire frame figures. A blacksmith shoes the White Unicorn nearby.

V/O BRIAN

Animatronics is a method of

filming frame by frame models

of huge fantasy creatures.

Elements of film are crafted

together to create the images you see.

A film projector cranks into action and beams a 35mm film clip of Godzilla standing in a miniature cityscape. The mass of tiny humans flee in terror while the Military Personnel stand their ground, raking the towering monster with ineffective machine gun fire.

                                                  V/O BRIAN

Let's reverse the process. Let's

split all the separate images

and then mesh them back together.

The images as nine different elements of the original film slowly form into the one image of Godzilla in his miniature landscape.

INT. WORKSHOP. DAY.

Mix from the massive onscreen Godzilla to the 12-inch Godzilla skeleton figure. As it slowly turns on a revolve, mix to different angles as parts of his costume materialize and completing his appearance.

On the turntable and in close up, a pair of hands demonstrates the different postures the now clad Godzilla can do. In the background models of buildings, props and backdrops fill the scene.

                                             V/O. BRIAN

Will animal costumes, prosthetics,

CGI, electronics, and animatronics

ever replace real animals in the movies?

FILM CLIP "GODZILLA" OLD AND NEW FOOTAGE.

Godzilla in 3-D confronts the camera.

FILM CLIP. BRITISH AIRWAYS COMMERCIAL

Commercial of whales floating through the interior of a BA 747. Various angles.

A dozen television screens bring up images of animals used as corporate images

V/O. BRIAN

Corporations have used the images

of animal for centuries…some have

given back by funding conservation...

most have not.

We see the Ferrari sports car and the dancing horse, Esso and the Bengal Tiger, Reynolds Tobacco and the camel, US Mail and the Golden Eagle. The MGM lion and the Hartford Insurance stag. As the company name comes up, the screens begin to slow motion explode one by one. The debris falls into camera.

V/O. BRIAN

Now we in the motion picture industry are exploiting

the image of creatures both real and created in the

quest for entertainment.

EXT. HILLSIDE NIGHT MUSIC MONTAGE

A visual celebration and torchlight procession of the characters and dancers in the style of Circ de Sol and other theatrical productions using creatures such as "Cats", "Equus" and "Beauty and the Beast".

EXT. FARM. DAWN.

The camera cranes with Young Brian who is clambering onto the roof of a dilapidated barn where a stranded kitten is mewing pitifully. A rotten plank snaps and Young Brian drops towards camera! He grabs the guttering and manages to haul himself onto the roof just as the loose gutter breaks away from the wall sending debris down towards the camera. Young Brian picks up the kitten and cradles it in his arms.

EXT. RANCH. DAY MONTAGE

Close on Brian's hands as he strokes a cheetah cub. A local zoo has donated the cub to him after rejection by the mother.

V/O BRIAN

Friends and neighbours have

always delivered the waifs and

strays to me.

Montage of the continuous circle of care, feeding, cleaning and training.

EXT. RIVER BANK. DAY,

A Giraffe spreads its legs as it drinks its fill. On standing up the giraffe's head is close to camera and we get the chance to study the beauty of the eyes and facial features. It begins to eat the foreground foliage.

                                                V/O BRIAN

The giraffe is the tallest animal on earth.

They can grow up to twenty feet in

height and weigh more than one ton.

Brian and his assistants load the animal onto its trailer, its head and neck appearing through the roof of the trailer.

                                              V/O BRIAN

The problem with travelling

giraffes are power lines,

tunnels, low bridges, in fact

even high bridges...getting a

sore throat can be a problem

as well.

EXT. RAILWAY BRIDGE DAY

Camera moving quickly comes to a stop a few inches from the bridge. The screeching of brakes and slammed doors holds our attention.

EXT. RAILWAY BRIDGE ANOTHER ANGLE DAY

Brian is scratching his head at the sight of the giraffe, its head close to the bridge wall chewing contently on the weeds hanging down. The scarf around its neck has very pretty pom poms on.

BRIAN V/O

Giraffe like creatures could once be found throughout

the world, including southern Europe and southeast Asia,

but today there are only two members of the family Giraffa,

the giraffe and the okapi. The okapi, one of the world's

rarest animals, is found only in the Ituri forest of

north-eastern Zaire.

EXT. RANCH HILLSIDE. SUNSET. MONTAGE

An animal shudders and breathes its last. Brian, stricken by grief and loss cradles its head for a moment. He looks up at an assistant and shakes his head. Tears form in his eyes as he slowly rises and walks away from the scene.

INT. ANIMAL ENCLOSURE. NIGHT. MONTAGE

Brian rejoices at the miracle of birth.

EXT. CAMPFIRE NIGHT

Campfire tales told by Brian or star actor to kids from local orphanage…use CGI to create mythical creatures…. These creatures come from the flames, shadows of the woods or the night time clouds and full moon

How Hollywood screen writers cull from Bible legends traditions fables myths

Half man half horse a centaur the most famous was Cheiron

Satyr named Pan half man half goat pipes lusty

EXT. HILLSIDE ABOVE RANCH DAWN

Framed against the dawn sky is an elephant. It is a solitary figure in the landscape

BRIAN V/O

Both African and Indian elephants have one thing in common:

a complex social structure. Herds are led by an old cow,

known as the matriarch. Her herd usually consists of her

daughters and granddaughters, as well as her sisters and

their offspring of both sexes. The young bulls, however,

leave or are forced out of the herd when they reach

maturity, between twelve and sixteen years of age.

EXT. RANCH. DAWN.

A saddened 70 year old Dottie is placing her beloved elephant, Acadi, in Charlie's Sammut's care. All three are silhouetted against the morning sky. Dottie shakes Charlie's hand then gives him a hug. Charlie turns away as she allows Acadi to wrap his trunk around her as a last farewell.

                                             V/O BRIAN

Dottie has been travelling with

Acadi for 30 years, first with the

circus, then working in movies,

opening State Fairs, rides for

the kids…and now over 80 she

cannot keep Acadi any more...

...so Charlie has promised to look

after this lovely old. That's

                                 Acadi not Dottie!

FILM CLIPS. MONTAGE

Dottie's black and white photographs and home movie clips of herself and Arcadi's shared experiences.

                                             V/O DOTTIE

I found Arcadi or she found me at

zoo that was going out of business

way back in the 40's, Kansas I

think it was. We have traveled to

all of the United States, except

Hawaii. Acadi gets seasick would

you believe.

EXT. RANCH. ANOTHER ANGLE DAWN.

Tears moisten the grand old lady's eyes. Charlie put his arm around her.

We track in with Charlie to Acadi's eye. Do we see tears?

EXT. RANCH. ANOTHER ANGLE DAWN.

Dottie takes heart in Charlie's immediate rapport with the elephant. They both get into the mud hole and hose each other off.

                                             V/O BRIAN

                                    Dottie's is most certainly

relieved. If Acadi hadn't taken

to Charlie, who can tell what

would have become of her beloved

friend. Behind bars at a zoo?

Without the caring contact of

humans she has had all her life?

A safari park with elephants she

has never seen before?

Can't go back to Africa, wouldn't

be able to cope...She was born in

Kansas! She's was born and raised

American, for heaven's sake!

Put down...Done to death?

Euthanasia? Never!

EXT. RANCH. CLOSE DAWN.

Dottie smiles and wipes a tear from her cheek. Acadi close on the camera, ears flapping, trunk waving is bellowing to wake the dead.

EXT. RANCH. DAY. MONTAGE

Reprise all the animals we have seen with their names.

Sidney the Snake

Connie the Cobra

Samantha the Spider

Teddy the Tarantula

Lilly the Lizard

Carol the Crocodile

Nelly the Elephant

Sammy the Staffie

Charlie the Chimp if we put him early

Minnie the Baby Mammoth

Harry the Horse

Josef the Lion

Polly the Python

Clyde the Orangutan

Terry the Tiger

Lassie the wonder dog

Larry and Curly the bear cube

Harpo and Dumo the baby chimps

Mama the Bear

Ollie the baby Orangutan

Geraldine the Grizzly Bear Bart if we use him

Felicity the Falcon

Bert the Buzzard

Vincent the Vulture

Elly the Bald Eagle

Dee Dee the Dolphin or Flipper

Bruce the Great White Shark

Uni the Unicorn

Godzilla as Godzilla

Wally and Winnie the Whales

Woof the Kitten

Chip the cheetah

Jolie the Giraffe

Acadi the Elephant

EXT. FANTASY LANDSCAPE. EVENING.

Acadi morph's back into a mammoth then gently helps Young Brian onto her back and walks away into the fantasyland of flowers. The baby mammoth follows, as does Brian.

Brian's dream lives on.

SUPERIMPOSE AND V/O:

                                                "Of a certainty...

The man who can see all creatures

in himself...

Himself in all creatures,

knows no sorrow..."

Eesha Upanishad.

END TITLES

"HOLLYWOOD'S ANIMAL ACTOR'S"

by

Peter Shillingford

2 Creefleet House

280 Kew Road

Richmond

TW9 3EE

0208 940 4507

0778 66 421 71

ufindshill@btinternet.com

RESEARCH FOR ADDED CONTENT

Big Foot Sasquatch Abominable Snowman Yeti

Medusa and her snake hair, killed by Perseus, offspring of Zeus. His face seen the clouds, magic sword winged sandals boots and a helmet that made him invisible

Phoenix rose from the ashes… of the campfire

Unicorn out of the clouds…mist fog night or dawn

Stars BEAR BIG and LITTLE Others?

Star signs ARIES THE RAM……TAURUS THE BULL…. GEMINI THE TWINS….CANCER THE CRAB….LEO THE LION … VIRGO THE MAIDEN…LIBRA MAN WITH SCALES….SCORPIO THE SCORPION….SAGITTARIUS…HALF MAN HALF HORSE WITH BOW AND ARROW….CAPRICORN THE GOAT…..AQUARIUS A MAN HOLDING ? PISCES….YIN AND YANG

Totem pole animal revered by Indians find a completed one in cave page 1 then have an Indian carver working at Brian's ranch, his teepee up the hill … build totem pole through film to final page

Indians dance with bear and wolf skin… Great Bear Almanac

Page 181-3 Shaman takes the bear as a spirit partner Bear festivals Great Bear Almanac page 186

St Ursula a British Saint was named after defending 11,000 virgins from a bear attack…we could not find 11,000 virgins in California so…

Yosemite was named after an Indian fable of a great hunter who killed a huge bear, they called the bear Yo-sem-i-te the hunter took the name, and the tribe in time was called Yo-sem-i-ties

Grizzly Adams travelled through Y in the 1800's with his bear carrying his pack.

Bill Woods a Californian woods man hangs out with wild bears and young to the extent he can play with the cubs.

President Teddy Roosevelt was presented with very small bear to shoot…he refused and got his nickname

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Jules Verne Disney Movie had a great fight with an octopus…and a futuristic sub? Use of footage and convert to 3-D or duplicate in miniature

Staffie should have a pal and protagonist…the baby chimp or orang-utan

Every October 17, on the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi, patron saint of animals, residents of Manhattan's Morningside Heights are treated to an unusual sight at the famous Cathedral of St. John the Divine. Led by the bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of New York, thousands of animals of all types, ranging from the exotic - huge, lumbering elephants, stately giraffes, dark-eyed Ilamas, and chattering monkeys, all "borrowed" from local zoos - to the more everyday, including dozens of dogs and cats, brilliantly feathered birds, even a New York sewer rat and a one-celled amoeba, make their way up the stone steps of this national landmark accompanied by their human attendants. The occasion is the Blessing of the Animals, which has become an annual event at the cathedral.

African Elephant is Dark gray

Size Length of head and body, including trunk, up to 24.8

feet; shoulder height, up to 13 feet. Weight may exceed 6

tons found in both males and females.

Tusks: Long tusks are found in both males and females

Average tusks will measure 6 to 8 feet in the bull elephant, but are

smaller in females.

Ears:Large ears that can measure over a yard across. The forest elephant has

Smaller ears than the bush elephant.

Forehead: Flat forehead

Trunks Ends in two fleshy lobes, sometimes called "fingers." The trunk has

definite ridges.

Other Differences: African elephant has three nails on hind leg, twenty-one pairs of ribs, and a concave, or sway, back.

Indian Elephant;Usually a lighter grey; may have light splotches over the body.

Length of head and body, including trunk 21,3 feet; shoulder height, 8.2-10.5 Up to 5.9 tons. As with the African elephant females are somewhat smaller.

Tusks Shorter than in the African elephant, from 4 to 5 feet in bulls.

In the female the tusks are tiny or nonexistent. A subspecies from Sumatra is tuskless.

Much smaller than in the African elephant

Two bumps on forehead

Smoother trunk that ends in one "finger"

Indian elephant has four nails on hind foot. Nineteen pairs of ribs, and a convex back